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  1. #15
    Senior Member Rob.e's Avatar
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    Oct 2013
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    Havant
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    I paid a lot of money for my 120 but subsequently spent 70 on a 104 to replace the screamer I had been given and 100 on an 84 litre FSW for really windy days (so far I have sailed that for 10 minutes). You don't need the very latest kit to get started again though I'm sure I will buy newer when I get better! there are quite a few packages available and knowing what I know now I'd go for one of them- I use a site called "Windsurfing stuff for sale or wanted" on Facebook and there is loads of kit on there. I have done two holidays in Dahab and Kos and mainly used boards from 150l to 120 so that might be a good starter range- do not expect to see people on sinkers anymore (my last boards were a Screamer 103l and a 65l Lightwave so much smaller than my current range). You may also be surprised that people like you and I are probably one of the largest age groups on the beach, the demographic has changed!

  2. #16
    Senior Member PK1111's Avatar
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    Oct 2008
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    Some good advice here.
    Definitely try and get away somewhere and try a few boards if you can.
    If not, then I'd aim for something free ridey with an extra 20 litres of volume, for lighter winds. Of course if inland, then a bit bigger!

    Sails to suit, anything between 6m and 8m. New rigs are wonderfully light, manoeuvrable, yet powerful and have a superb range. You might be tempted to go for a mid size sail, but my advice is to plan on having 2 rigs from the get go. You'll get a lot more use out of the whole set up. Avoid cambers, there relly is no need.

    once you are up to speed with that, then a second board nearer your weight is advisable, for those lovely windy days and smaller rigs.
    Good luck and welcome back.
    pk

  3. #17
    Senior Member
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    May 2012
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    117

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    Quote Originally Posted by /Vico View Post
    And yes, they are bigger, for a given wind strength. But not many "general" windsurfers use anything bigger than a 7 metre, much like the old days.
    Eh, I sail at the coast and one of my most used sails is my 8.4m

    It depends how much time you want on the water, I try to get out as much as I can and am quite happy blasting on a 133 freeride with 8m whilst others are sat on the beach waiting for 5m weather.

    If you want lots of time on the water and are intending on doing a fair bit of loch sailing as well as on the sea i'd get:
    a 133L or 140L freeride board and an 8.5ish sail (anything over 8.5m is not so enjoyable unless you are race boarding imo) That should get you going in moderate winds and allow you to uphaul easily if the wind dies and you are far out.

    and a 110L ish FSW board for stronger winds with 6.0ish and 5.0ish sails.

    As others have mentioned a common mistake is to have the old sinker mentality. People tend to sail boards with more volume now, made possible by their short fat designs. When I started again my first purchase was a 75L wave board as that is what I stopped on years before!!....big mistake..

    Have a chat with your local shop, they will explain all.

    Welcome back

  4. #18
    Senior Member ash34's Avatar
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    May 2010
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    Bexhill , Sussex
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    Hey , ive missed this thread!!

    Im 110kg and have also returned to sailing after a long break (20years) , when I returned I got a Kona 11'5 which , paired with a 6.6 , got me out and sailing and back into the sport , I then swapped that for a Kona 10'5 which I still use regularly with 6.6 and 6.0 sails . Ive tried many boards from 96 litres to 130 litres for higher winds but have decided that there is nothing realy designed for us heavier sailors as a wave board . I am currently trying an RRD 120 FSW to see how this works , hopefully this weekend will give me a good idea !!! A friend who I sail with nearly all the time is just under 110kg uses fanatic freewaves 105 and 115 very succesfully , but I didnt really get on with them :-( I also have slalom boards and big sails for when its light , Mistral 140 slalom and Simmer scr 9.5 works great on light wind days !!

    Sail sizes are another thing , I tend to be on 6.6 when 80-85 kg (approx) sailors are on 5.7 , then I go to 6.0 (when they on 4.7 - 5.3 ) then I go to 5.7 . The 6.6 and 6.0 are XO Quads ,which are powerful freeride sails , then 5.7 is an XO shark , powerful wave sail . I very rarely use smaller especially on the south coast , although you should get more wind in scotland!! But dont fall into the mentality of seeing what everyones is rigging then rigging a little bit bigger , you have to rig a lot bigger in my experience other wise you will slogging and generally not enjoying yourself!!!! Theres no reason for us bigger sailors to struggle you just have to work out whats right for you !!

    I would 100% recommend a Kona 10'5 if you can find one , although people hang on to them , it will work as a blasting board , but also good fun in waves , and is also just like sailing old skool boards !!
    Heavyweight struggling with boards designed for little people

    http://www.sussex-windsurfing.co.uk

  5. #19
    Senior Member Capie's Avatar
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    Jan 2013
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    Cape Town
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    Get a Fanatic Gecko or a similar wide freeride board. Use that for at least a year and then maybe try a Freewave. I've written elsewhere on this forum about my experience coming back to windsurfing after a long lay-off but that's the redux.
    My Boards: 1992 Windsurfer One Design, 2012 Fanatic Freewave 85l, 2013 Fanatic Gecko 105l

  6. #20
    Senior Member
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    Jul 2004
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    Used to be a comebacker myself and wasted a lot of time and money on different set ups. Rather than focus on boards I would start with a 6.2 quality rotational sail rigged on it's recommended (and same brand RDM mast) with a high carbon content and a good solid boom. This is a sail type/size that will most likely be very useful over the coming years. It may not get you planing straight away. On the other hand it will be light and manouvrable enough to serve as a training sail also for non planing days. Almost every good sailor has spent a lot of time in light winds.


    Next buy Peter Harts book Windsurfing and read it at least three times.


    Finally beg, buy or borrow just about any board that will float you and your rig and learn get maximum power out of the rig both for forward movement (planing?) and for turning up and down wind. Exaggerate all body movements.


    What board(s) you are going to end up with and which rigs you will complement them with depends on a host of factors - including conditions and skills (hopefully a moving target). A good 6.2 and ditto technique will however always be useful.
    Last edited by boards_Tomas; 8th August 2014 at 07:33 PM.
    It's strange the times people choose to be generous

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