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  1. #1

    OT building costs

    Given the high van count along the windsurfing south, I'm guessing there's a bunch of tradesmen amongst the forum pool. So if someone was looking at a single storey extension, decent build quality, one big room, one small room, totalling 25m2, what price range are we talking all in? Kent/sussex border. Just beginning to get quotes through and thinking that builders must have a healthy business pipeline.
    Trying not to work too hard.

  2. #2
    Senior Member
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    1,500/m2 ex VAT?

  3. #3
    Senior Member lostboy's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by boxsterboy View Post
    1,500/m2 ex VAT?
    Is a reasonable starting point, assuming not too many abnormals*.

    (drainage/services/ground conditions issues etc.)


    Your biggest problem at the moment is likely to be finding someone decent to build it. The market at just about every level has gone completely mad and most contractors have order books that are full for the next six months or so. Make sure you get good references for the builders, choose the one that you really feel will deliver for the price (not always the cheapest) and then get yourself into their schedule. Keep checking on them to make sure that the labour they use remains the same (because they are only as good as their tradesmen) and that your start date remains roughly the same. They should be prepared to show you some commitment back (in terms of communication) if you are willing to wait.

    EDIT: Other thing to check out - I assume you'll be matching a brick to your existing house? Brick supplies are disastrous at the moment, the housebuilders have bought up just about all the current production so it's worth checking what your brick is and what kind of availability it's on. You may find that you'll get a builder that can start before you can actually get the bricks! (We're telling clients and consultants to design without masonry wherever possible if they want stuff built in the next 12 months)
    Last edited by lostboy; 30th July 2014 at 08:43 AM.
    Got an opinion? Great. Guess what, so's everyone else!

  4. #4
    Senior Member jknhismassivevan's Avatar
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    Good points from LB there especially on the brick front, one way round that I've found is that a lot of mixed developments now have house with a mix of brick and block and render, for an extension where it will always look like an extension I've found my local planners will accept block and render tinted to a neutral colour.

    The way I tend to do smaller extensions like this is to break it into different elements, groundwork, brick or blockwork, windows, roof, plastering and utilities. It takes way more project management and responsibility on your behalf but the savings are big especially if you stay flexible on dates. I've found this method very effective as often busy builders who can't fit in a 6-8 week complete build can fit in 4 days to do the groundwork or the bricks/blocks. I've never had any problem finding a roofing chippie or a roofer either. The main thing is to be 100% clear on spec for each element so that there is no overlap (double costing) or worse there being a significant disconnect between them so that you end up stumping up more money. A good set of drawings helps you with that but costs money, for the inexperienced IMO the cost will equate to savings especially if you personally have a bit of a skills deficit which I'm very lucky to say is the opposite for me so I can bridge the gaps between the different trades quite easily and with minimal cost. If you are happy to take on time consuming jobs like fitting instulation in roof voids then you can save a lot of money and you get a better job because you care how efficient it is.
    The Windsurfer Formally Known as JKRR - TWFKJKRR or "Him in the Red Shorts"

  5. #5
    Thanks guys. Got pp plans already and structural calcs and drawings are lined up to happen when back from France. Have met with builders who all have good references from friends and I've seen their work. Sadly first quot is coming in at 3k per m, which I think takes the pi$$.
    Trying not to work too hard.

  6. #6
    Senior Member TwoFish's Avatar
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    You can hardly blame them for taking advantage of the bubble before it bursts.

    Lostboy. Is there a speculative market in bricks yet, or brick gazzumping going on? That would I think be a sign that trouble is just around the corner.
    Eeeh 'tis grim dahn Sarf.

  7. #7
    Senior Member jknhismassivevan's Avatar
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    Gutted that does sound expensive, ask them to break the quote down into seperate cost elements, find out if they will be using theor own guy or bringing someone in. It will put some off but if they aren't willing to discuss it or work with you on it then IMO they are not the ones to go with. I've always found that flexibility needs to be there from the outset especially at that cost.

    I suspect if you spent some time with the architect and broke the jobs into spec'd elements you could price them all seperately and make a lot of savings.
    The Windsurfer Formally Known as JKRR - TWFKJKRR or "Him in the Red Shorts"

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