Page 1 of 32 1 2 3 4 5 11 ... LastLast
Results 1 to 7 of 221
  1. #1
    Senior Member Jibe Monkey's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2012
    Posts
    1,113

    Relevance of new designs to the intermediate?

    Over the last few years there have been quite a few new directions in kit design, particularly with wave kit. But bearing in mind how a lot of wave gear is bought and sailed by intermediates in less than ideal conditions, how relevant are these changes? I'm thinking of multi-fin boards and 3-4 batten wave sails? I'm sure they add something to the person who sails in proper waves and knows what they are doing, but what about Joe Bloggs, the bump and jumper? Do they add anything?

    Discuss...

    (Ok, there's been no wind in yonks, I'm bored and I'm fed up with reading the normal bickering that litters the forum nowadays...)
    Tacking is the new gybing.....

  2. #2
    Senior Member Sailrepair's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Location
    Helensburgh
    Posts
    1,558
    I think the multifin wave boards are of most benefit to average wave sailors. The good sailors are good on most boards but for those with less fine tuned ability the modern wave board is a great thing allowing them to do things they have been trying for years. (wave riding that is, they won't help you loop).

    With sails for the average sailor not a lot of difference. No one is being held back by a 5 year old sail.

  3. #3
    Senior Member max111's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2004
    Posts
    1,581
    Quote Originally Posted by Jibe Monkey View Post
    Over the last few years there have been quite a few new directions in kit design, particularly with wave kit. But bearing in mind how a lot of wave gear is bought and sailed by intermediates in less than ideal conditions, how relevant are these changes? I'm thinking of multi-fin boards and 3-4 batten wave sails? I'm sure they add something to the person who sails in proper waves and knows what they are doing, but what about Joe Bloggs, the bump and jumper? Do they add anything?

    Discuss...

    (Ok, there's been no wind in yonks, I'm bored and I'm fed up with reading the normal bickering that litters the forum nowadays...)
    i think the goal posts have moved in what we class as an intermediate (expert ) etc in the last few years

    an expert used to be someone who could sail a tiny board well ?

    the new kit is for me more user friendly so instead of trying to sail the smallest board possible we can all relax and try a few moves

    i have moved over to multi-fin boards from singles and for me the time i get to make a bottom turn in on-shore conditions has been extended as i now know the board will stay on the plane despite a few wrong weight shifts (maybe ) before if you didn't get it spot on the whole board stalled and dropped of the plane smack wave takes you out

    we now know what we would like to do on the waves and the kit gives us a chance to go for it

    sails i'm still in transition from 2007 quiver to a 2014 quiver and haven't really sailed them enough to give good feedback they do feel more stable and have a much bigger wind range from the 2007's

  4. #4
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Location
    Bournemouth
    Posts
    2,389
    Irrespective of using them in waves modern multifin wave boards have a lot of relevance as high wind blasting kit. The multifins allow you to get away with a bit more float in these circumstances, which is alaways good, and they generally have a better top end than an equivalent single fin. More but smaller fins are useful in shallow harbour environments where sailing into a sandbank at 25 kts isint a pleasant experience. The jumping on twins and quads is usually noticablt worse and the fun in a straight line isint quite there compared to a single, but when it's honking these ar more than compensated for by the other strengths.

  5. #5
    Senior Member PK1111's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Posts
    1,123
    I agree, multi fin wave boards are a significant improvement over older designs, and that only means 5 years.
    Of course there are a whole host of design changes and some boards are still quite challenging for an intermediate to sail, but generally most boards do what the shaper says they were designed for. Thankfully the amount of marketing bollox has subsided and you can rely more on what the manufacturers state.

    So sailing larger boards, in comfort, with the same bottom end, improved manoeuvrability and superb top end control is fantastic and well worth the upgrade.

    wave sails have developed a bit, and the most noticeable upgrade you can make is to a fresh new sail from an old one. The new 4 batten sails are a joy in the waves, even onshore, but you have to like that light flicky feel.

    The real question is how these design changes will impact the middle board market. I'm thinking 90 to 100 litres and 5m to 6m sails?
    Thars traditionally been the preserve of single fin fsw boards, but I'm wondering if all round designs might come into their own, a la chakra?

    Maybe not in the rest of Europe which is why these boards are shipped with such big fins. I was surprised to find that 80% plus of tws clients stick to the single fins! which in el medano is interesting!
    Pk

  6. #6
    I think multi fin boards are great and have improved the wave performance of average size boards and have improved many board shapes used by top sailors and intermediate wave heads.
    The boards can just turn easier and you can do more rail-focused moves without the board overpowering from the tail.

    But I also think the excitement of multi-fins has lead some people up the wrong path.
    For example, if you are just blasting around on sails of 5.5 or bigger then a long single fin gives the better ride, better early planing and better top speed. For jumping, it's also arguable that single fins are still the best.

    If multi fin boards are easier to gybe for people with bad technique then you could argue it's the multi fin board that holds them back from getting better technique. Perhaps that is a killjoy argument.

    However, I still shudder when I see multi fin boards being sailed on a lake or on other flat water – like at Portland harbour.
    Main boards: Flare 101, NuEvo 86, Reactor 82, NuEvo 73. Powered by Severne Blades and S1s.

  7. #7
    Senior Member Navegante's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Location
    40 48'N 14 26'E -Western Med - West South Atlantic
    Posts
    2,406
    Quote Originally Posted by basher View Post
    I think multi fin boards are great and have improved the wave performance of average size boards and have improved many board shapes used by top sailors and intermediate wave heads.
    The boards can just turn easier and you can do more rail-focused moves without the board overpowering from the tail.

    But I also think the excitement of multi-fins has lead some people up the wrong path.
    For example, if you are just blasting around on sails of 5.5 or bigger then a long single fin gives the better ride, better early planing and better top speed. For jumping, it's also arguable that single fins are still the best.

    If multi fin boards are easier to gybe for people with bad technique then you could argue it's the multi fin board that holds them back from getting better technique. Perhaps that is a killjoy argument.

    However, I still shudder when I see multi fin boards being sailed on a lake or on other flat water – like at Portland harbour.
    The thing is Basher that if that is what those owners are happy with... who cares good for them they will likely make their own
    progress and nothing gives joy and helps motivation like having that board that you want.

    In any case someone that got himself a less than biggish multifin board is possibly past the beginner stage enough to, yeah maybe struggle a bit at the beginning but not for long and then try the board in the environment it was built for.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •