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  1. #8

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    I'm reading this question as being about new boards not jumping as well as older gear – where the older gear is longer and maybe narrower.

    I guess having less windage out in front of you may mean less lift on take off. But we still see massive jumps from pros on new gear, so you have to wonder if some of this is also a technique thing.


    A good jump comes from having a steep ramp which you hit at speed. The windage then helps lift the board after take off.

    So any hull shape will have the windage it has and you can't change that. And here, it sounds like the ramps are the same (albeit big 'chop').
    So is this new board a bit slow to plane or relatively slow at top speed?

    When leaving the wave, the other stuff which can affect jump height are how soft (how sticky!) the rails are, and what fin area you have to push against as you work the ramp.


    Interesting issue though. Not something I've heard of before.
    Local wind only this week? Catch it if you can.

  2. #9
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Posts
    265

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    Quote Originally Posted by GreatLakes View Post
    purchased a new but 2009 model Naish FreeRide slalom board also 105 Ltrs. The board is shorter and wider.
    Interesting question.

    These tests mention your board I believe. Its slalom orientated so maybe the rocker line doesn't lend itself to chop hopping/jumping as the lack of rocker might not let the front ride up the chop so well????


    http://www.boardseekermag.com/equipm...slalom_2007-2/

    This is the working man’s slalom board: easy to sail but with the rocker line based on Naish’s Slalom Pro range, the boards still have the top speed potential of a pure slalom model. But it has been designed to work with freeride sails, in Naish’s case, that’s the Redline & Boxer Slalom.

    http://www.boardseekermag.com/equipm...rint-sail-062/

    Note on the Freeride Slalom
    Michi: The Freeride Slalom (which will be discontinued in the future) is a more slalom oriented shape that is offered in different volume classes to the Freewide. The Freewide starts at 120 litres while the Freeride slalom only goes up to 125 litres. It offers less planing performance with a more narrow, more slalom oriented feel.

  3. #10
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2014
    Location
    Windsor, Ontario, Canada
    Posts
    4

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    Quote Originally Posted by Navegante View Post
    But more width to be blown. If you have sailed truly old school boards you'd have the feeling with a new one comparatively it's like gliding on a giant flip flop! Ha!
    LMAO i think that pretty much describes it " a giant flip flop" Great point about the foot strap placement. It made be think back to my old Fanatic Mega Rat...what a great jumping board that was...again in the 105 ltr range with the single center rear strap. . I understand that the smaller boards are much easier to jump in the 85-90 ltr range but given our conditions the 105 seems to be the best one size fits all.
    I can't think off hand without looking at the board if the strap placement is variable but i will definitely check that out.

  4. #11
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2014
    Location
    Windsor, Ontario, Canada
    Posts
    4

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    very interesting...its funny; i usually jump best on Starboard my comfortable side but with the Naish it seems to leave the water easier on a Port tack; my very awkward jumping side. I think you make an excellent point about the rocker line not lending itself to chop hopping. On that note maybe there are some good suggestions about boards in the 105 range that the group finds fast and good for jumping chop. thanks for the input

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