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  1. #29

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    Quote Originally Posted by sbky View Post
    What time were you down there Alistair? I had a limited window so headed down for around midday, the tide was wrong which meant a horrible rip - not enough power on a 4.7 to get through the whitewater. Had one run and called it a day as I was alone.
    I got there about 3pm but it was nearer 4pm until I went out as I waited for a kitesurfer to arrive and help him launch his kite. It wasn't the most inviting day for sailing alone!

    Hopefully next time we might be there at the same time. Send me a PM or post on the Forces of Nature website and I should see it.

  2. #30
    Super Moderator na-omi's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by rod View Post
    I wonder if anyone will get ill from sailing there yesterday?
    no ill-effects so far, but so much fresh water coming out of the harbour it was hard to believe you were sailing in the sea! Current didn't do much for my upwind ability when underpowered on the Evo either... gonna have to get better at that again, been too easy on the magic carpet of late, and made such a difference swapping onto it when the wind dropped... gawd I love that board!

    Great day, and so good to see so many folk out, especially when you rock up at the beach and the first few out pull loops off the first little ramp as you're wondering what to rig. Proper two-session day too, with the early wind and longer daylight. Some inspirational sailing from others and a fun time in forgiving conditions for me, interspersed with the inevitable upwind walks, one kindly assisted by an ex-windsurfer from back in the day There were times when you thought you were making great ground upwind over the water, only to check the shore and find that water was moving longshore faster than you could sail

    Sea-trialled my new Rip Curl Flash Bomb 5/4 hooded suit (they don't seem to do a 'plus' for girls) and thought I would die of heat exhaustion! Felt a bit of twit when I discovered that the rather-too-long arms work better when the rubber cuff seal is turned in against the skin.. doh! But not as foolish as when I sailed out with the front zip undone after pulling the van key out (having the hood up makes you think you're all tucked in) and taking a fair sized one on the head. Thought I would get cold after shovelling a big chunk of sea down the suit, but nope, still toasty, so zipped up and carried on. Darned thing drains quick on and off the water, and is touch-dry on the inside in minutes, just like it says on the videos! Seems like it might be an unnecessary purchase this year, but the March of doom may yet be upon us

  3. #31
    Senior Member crossy5575's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Billyboy View Post
    crossy/geko - when its a bit hairy and onshore at shoreham, lancing is often much easier with less rip and chop, better spaced waves and a better angle. You can still have a long swim at lancing if there is significant swell, but since the sailing is less challenging you are less likely to go down in the wrong place*. You also get a bit more tidal range before the shorebreak kicks in...

    *that's the theory anyway - one I've recently proved by being the exception to the rule
    Thanks for the kind words, it was quite strange as I didn’t find it too hard to get out through the sets, and having sailed at Shoreham for 25 years know most of its patterns. It wasn’t really the conditions that caused the problem – I was warm, wetsuit not too tight, boots keeping the feet warm with a hood and a helmet on.
    However a big roller just broke around me enough to take the kit a bit away and surf down the face, at which point it was gone and no chance to catch it. At that point after about 4-5 mins I felt I wasn’t making much progress, breathing was becoming far shallower to the point of hyperventilation and my harness was more of a hindrance than help, in so far I felt quite claustrophobic.
    The swim in was tiring, however I thought I would normally be able to make it, however the cold and restrictions of the wetsuit probably ¼ my ability to swim any distance, and with waves breaking over me on a regular basis there was no rest bite.
    This is the first time I have ever felt alone and quite resigned to the fact I might not make it, remember thinking I don’t want the last thing I see to be Shoreham houses in the rain! (I was also constructing my obituary at the same time as paddling in!)
    I guess without a flare no one would have seen me – my wife and kids were in the beach hut, and hadn’t noticed I was in trouble – why would they as I wasn’t gone for more than 30 mins which is a usual sailing period. A phone would have been no use – on the assumption I could make a call – what would I say – I am drowning!
    I think yes I need to be fitter – definitely would have helped. I didn’t think I was beyond my limits, which in sailing terms I have faced much worse. I suppose just a lesson in how fast simple situations can get out of control. Strangely enough on making it back to the beach I didn’t feel too tired, I think my harness restricted my breathing and shock and panic reduced my ability to deal with the situation rationally.
    Lesson learnt from my part – and hope that anyone else in a similar circumstance might either think before taking off or not panicking when it happens.

  4. #32
    Senior Member SteveE's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by crossy5575 View Post
    Thanks for the kind words, it was quite strange as I didn’t find it too hard to get out through the sets, and having sailed at Shoreham for 25 years know most of its patterns. It wasn’t really the conditions that caused the problem – I was warm, wetsuit not too tight, boots keeping the feet warm with a hood and a helmet on.
    However a big roller just broke around me enough to take the kit a bit away and surf down the face, at which point it was gone and no chance to catch it. At that point after about 4-5 mins I felt I wasn’t making much progress, breathing was becoming far shallower to the point of hyperventilation and my harness was more of a hindrance than help, in so far I felt quite claustrophobic.
    The swim in was tiring, however I thought I would normally be able to make it, however the cold and restrictions of the wetsuit probably ¼ my ability to swim any distance, and with waves breaking over me on a regular basis there was no rest bite.
    This is the first time I have ever felt alone and quite resigned to the fact I might not make it, remember thinking I don’t want the last thing I see to be Shoreham houses in the rain! (I was also constructing my obituary at the same time as paddling in!)
    I guess without a flare no one would have seen me – my wife and kids were in the beach hut, and hadn’t noticed I was in trouble – why would they as I wasn’t gone for more than 30 mins which is a usual sailing period. A phone would have been no use – on the assumption I could make a call – what would I say – I am drowning!
    I think yes I need to be fitter – definitely would have helped. I didn’t think I was beyond my limits, which in sailing terms I have faced much worse. I suppose just a lesson in how fast simple situations can get out of control. Strangely enough on making it back to the beach I didn’t feel too tired, I think my harness restricted my breathing and shock and panic reduced my ability to deal with the situation rationally.
    Lesson learnt from my part – and hope that anyone else in a similar circumstance might either think before taking off or not panicking when it happens.
    I've had a very similar experience at camber, harness felt too tight so i tried to loosen that and I also took off my neoprene balaclava. Much better once that was removed and I just sort of paddled slowly letting the waves take me in. Only about a 30min swim and i ended up coming in to see my kit on the beach. Most worrying thing was Rob the coastguard had spotted my kit being washed in but couldn't see me until I was on the beach!

  5. #33
    Senior Member peter b's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by drakey View Post
    Should have been there later Pete. I got on the water about 1:30 with a 4.2 ad had a great time.
    The story of my life: It was either better before I turned up or got better after I left

    It seems everyone else enjoyed it so the problem's mine - I'm just a miserable git.
    It did look better from the comfort of my car whilst drinking hot coffee after a hot shower. I s'pose a bit more patience is required but at this time of the year I like to turn up, rig up. sail and go. Not quite warm enough for hangin' around waitin'.
    Here to share the love.

  6. #34
    Senior Member boards_Geko's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by crossy5575 View Post
    This is the first time I have ever felt alone and quite resigned to the fact I might not make it, remember thinking I don’t want the last thing I see to be Shoreham houses in the rain! (I was also constructing my obituary at the same time as paddling in
    Crossy, I think anyone that sails at Shoreham long enough must have hadthis type of experience. I know I certainly have, hence the reasoning with themobile phone. Not so much to call the wife (she'd be too busy ringing theinsurance company) but to call the coast guard, which you can do even with itin a waterproof pouch!

    Everything you described I've been through - including a sudden conversion toChristianity! I broke a U/J a long way out and watched my board sail awaycompletely oblivious to the fact that I was no longer attached. I have to agreethose first few minutes of 'flight or flee' panic are probably what's going toget you killed. I would also advise anyone to stop and think of a rationalstrategy to get to the beach. I took me two hours to get in using just the sailfor flotation and partial drive - I only just made the right side of the harbourarms, so you know how far down I went! I'm convinced that if I’d dumped thesail and tried to swim I'd not be here now.

    Geko

    Slowly racking the planet!
    http://www.vehicle-racking-systems.co.uk/

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