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  1. #85
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    Amazing so many people seem to place a lot of meaning to the "volume" figure printed on the board. Firstly, it can be totally inaccurate and second, even if accurate the volume distribution can be very different board to board. I think many people associate volume with whether a board will float when off the plane. That presumably means the board is still moving albeit slowly........in which case it is the dynamic volume that is experienced not the static volume. The dynamic volume will appear higher than the static volume and the difference will be affected by the board width/plan shape/volume distribution/hull shape/rails etc. I have never seen any figure quoted for dynamic volume/float probably because it increases with speed through the water so is a variable. I figure for dynamic volume assuming a sub planning speed...say 4/5 knots would be interesting though.
    When folks are out on very small kit, it is usually very windy, and that usually means even in lulls there is still enough wind to propel the board forward to some degree. I know 90k plus guys who use 80/85 litre boards and they are not up to their knees in a lull unless the wind dies completely such that they cannot make any forward progress. I am sure a number of brands understate even the static volume on some of their boards just to get them to fit expected categories ( 75/80/85/90/96 etc).........or maybe to flatter the rider!

  2. #86
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    Default Obese??

    ps............it now appears the most useful determination of obesity ( at least for a man) is waist size as a ratio of height rather than the BMI. More important than overall bodyweight however, is the percentage of fat in the body and most especially visceral fat. Even the thinnest person can be prone to diabetes etc if their visceral fat level is too high..........overall size is no guide in this case. You can get a measure of visceral fat and overall fat with bio scales or MRI scans but unfortunately the only totally accurate method is a post mortem!!

  3. #87

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    Quote Originally Posted by na-omi View Post
    Do you mean you swap your feet before going into the gybe, or before flipping the rig... trying to imagine the former and keep falling off my swivel chair
    Before the gybe - go in switch stance - much easier.
    http://forwards4cowards.blogspot.com/ a blog about looping

    UPDATED 31 Dec 2012
    Bumper Christmas

  4. #88
    Super Moderator na-omi's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by rod View Post
    Before the gybe - go in switch stance - much easier.
    something else to practice.... better get some in on flat water before trying it whilst wobbling along off the plane in front of a wave : D

  5. #89

    Arrow

    Quote Originally Posted by rod View Post
    Before the gybe - go in switch stance - much easier.
    will definitely try that- even with the 105 Chakra, sounds far easier to adapt to this than switching feet after the flip!

    cheers Rod
    _____________

    longboarding is the new grooveriding

  6. #90
    Senior Member Graemef's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by paul s View Post
    Agree with Rod on the early foot swap if things are looking tricky.
    (Awaits a slap from Grumpf....)

    But as said elsewhere, like all gybing, speed and power are your friends.
    No slap from me, Rod's describing off the plane handling of the situation, I can't imagine how much more difficult it is for big guys to stay on the plane on small boards, all that bulk...

    Windsurfing was only ever intended for small folk until that great Dunkerbeck interloper came and ruined everything.

    Truth is no one teaches high wind gybing it's something you have to work out for yourself, the guru's concentrate on low to mid wind action, me I always likened it to slalom mono water ski-ing only with the added complication of having to transition the damn sail thing instead of just switching hands on a tow rope.

    So, I spent every waking moment practising rig transitions til i could do it without thinking, then it all became automatic, up to a point.

    Everything Max says, works, in fact everything everyone says, works for them, but us light weights don't drop off the plane as quick as big guys, so we perhaps might have a bit of an easier time of it, not that i want to admit to it..

  7. #91

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    Quote Originally Posted by mikerb View Post
    Amazing so many people seem to place a lot of meaning to the "volume" figure printed on the board. Firstly, it can be totally inaccurate and second, even if accurate the volume distribution can be very different board to board. I think many people associate volume with whether a board will float when off the plane. That presumably means the board is still moving albeit slowly........in which case it is the dynamic volume that is experienced not the static volume. The dynamic volume will appear higher than the static volume and the difference will be affected by the board width/plan shape/volume distribution/hull shape/rails etc. I have never seen any figure quoted for dynamic volume/float probably because it increases with speed through the water so is a variable. I figure for dynamic volume assuming a sub planning speed...say 4/5 knots would be interesting though.
    When folks are out on very small kit, it is usually very windy, and that usually means even in lulls there is still enough wind to propel the board forward to some degree. I know 90k plus guys who use 80/85 litre boards and they are not up to their knees in a lull unless the wind dies completely such that they cannot make any forward progress. I am sure a number of brands understate even the static volume on some of their boards just to get them to fit expected categories ( 75/80/85/90/96 etc).........or maybe to flatter the rider!
    Mikerb, I agree on most this except that I would prefer to talk about lift rather than "dynamic volume". And even with the same volume and lift, other details in the shape will affect how it feels when slogging the board. FX rail and deck shape definitely affect the balance of the board in the water when semi-sinking on it.

    Something I don't necessarily agree on is that more wind typically also means enough wind also in lulls. Often really windy conditions also means pretty gusty conditions, and there can be periods when you have very little power in the sail. As you say though, unless you are standing totally still, the lift of the board will keep you from sinking fast even on a small volume board.

    As a matter of fact, I often feel surprised how little the "feel of float" improves when I go for a bigger board. Normally I use a 75 liter also in pretty light winds, but at times I grab an 85 (narrow big wave model, sort of). Of course it feels a tad corkier, but you still have to stay relatively concentrated when slogging to avoid tail or nose sinking etc etc. Conversely, even on a 69 in winds far, far below planing, balance is not _that_ more demanding. I reckon there is a lot of psychology involved, if you _think_ your board is on the small side, it will affect you slogging confidence and confidence is very important in such situations.
    Ola H.

    Simmer Style Boards and Sails

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