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  1. #8
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    Short slashy bottom turn and QUICK cutback can work in side onshore waves.
    What works better is backside wave riding, doing shoveit's to hit the lip, and you can still do roundhouse cutbacks toeside before turning back heelside.

  2. #9
    Senior Member Silicon Beach's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by LeeDD View Post
    Short slashy bottom turn and QUICK cutback can work in side onshore waves.
    What works better is backside wave riding, doing shoveit's to hit the lip, and you can still do roundhouse cutbacks toeside before turning back heelside.
    That's good advice, but perhaps it's expressed in a way that may be slightly too advanced to help the OP. He may not be au-fait with all of your freestyle and surfing terminology. To put it a way that might suit a more intermediate wave rider (eg like me) ...

    Onshore wave riding, linking both backside (heelside) and frontside (toeside) turns: Start by sailing hard upwind along a swell until it steepens and becomes a wave / starts to break. Carve hard with the heels up to the top of the wave (a backside bottom turn). Throw your weight over the rig and onto your toes as you hit the top of the wave to carve the board back down the wave (backside top turn). If you want to make this more radical, check out "shoveits" as suggested by Lee.

    Keep carving downwind / through the wind, open out the sail to clew first / switch stance etc following all the tips earlier in the thread (frontside bottom turn). Do as tight a bottom turn as your technique / your board allows to hit the top of the wave (ideally the lip itself) with as much speed as possible. Now instead of just doing a shallow top turn to continue downwind / down-the-line, carve the top turn really hard, with extra heel pressure to complete the turn all the way back upwind again (a frontside roundhouse cutback).

    This will then take you back into position for another backside bottom turn and so on ... you can link a few of these combinations to make S turns along the wave and stay close to the steepest / most critical section.
    Last edited by Silicon Beach; 29th July 2014 at 11:51 AM.
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  3. #10
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    [QUOTE=Silicon Beach;975654... Moving the hands - you are doing the first part - moving the back hand down the boom - but are you / when are you moving the back hand back up the boom to the harness lines ? I find that you need to do this a bit earlier than you think and this will help to open the sail and tighten the turn. [/QUOTE]


    Also read Jaeger Stones tips on waveriding on this site this morning (which seems to be in line with what SB writes above):


    "As you come out of your bottom turn and start transitioning into your top turn, you want to slide your back hand forwards towards your harness lines and really open up your clew so that you don’t get back-winded. Learning how to time the opening up of your clew as you come up the wave face will help you approach the lip more vertically and keep your speed throughout the top turn."


    I feel that this could be a very useful tip for someone like me who opens up much later. Could someone please expand both on how you get the timing right (practice of course) and why this actually works (I do not doubt that it does).


    I would also like to know if/how this applies to a situation where you have to straight line clew first along a wave for some time in the hope that it will offer a section that lends itself to top turning. Should moving of the boom hand then be delayed?
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  4. #11

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    Quote Originally Posted by boards_Tomas View Post

    "As you come out of your bottom turn and start transitioning into your top turn, you want to slide your back hand forwards towards your harness lines and really open up your clew so that you don’t get back-winded. Learning how to time the opening up of your clew as you come up the wave face will help you approach the lip more vertically and keep your speed throughout the top turn."


    I feel that this could be a very useful tip for someone like me who opens up much later. Could someone please expand both on how you get the timing right (practice of course) and why this actually works (I do not doubt that it does).

    This is about 'apparent wind' catching you up as you slow for the top turn – you have often turned dead downwind, even beyond the point of gybing, so you can get backwinded. If your bottom turn is a fast one, then the apparent wind stays on the nose because of forward board speed even as you turn up the wave.
    Moving your back hand forwards on the boom anticipates the top turn and allows the clew to open to avoid back winding as the 'real wind' catches up from behind the wave.
    It also releases the back hand pressure on the boom which in turn takes load off the carving back foot and allows you to load your front foot better to load the windward rail better to turn back towards the wind.

    To get the timing of this right you have to do this on feel. Learning to wave ride in onshore conditions is largely about learning to keep speed on the wave as your go downwind – so that apparent wind is your friend for longer.
    Last edited by basher; 29th July 2014 at 02:12 PM. Reason: missing 'and'
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  5. #12
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    Thank you Basher! I have long known that the sail must be opened for the top turn but have tried to get on my heels before moving my back hand - which makes for a very stiff and overpowered turn. Not good.




    I guess moving the back hand towards the lines will also enable you to hold the rig further forwards in the clew first position. At the same time it will probably make you feel less in control of the sail (as when beginners refuse to move their mast hand back towards the lines during normal sailing) - which could explain a general tendency to just hang on for dear life until the top turn is well under way ( or even longer .
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  6. #13
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    Got lucky to try out the backhand slide in very onhore but clean, steepish and semi fast waves today. And it worked! As Basher always points out speed is everything. Given enough speed you can slide your backhand back towards the lines at the bottom of the wave and go sligthtly more "vertical" than otherwise. And the top turn will be significantly more fluent.

    Have been watching a lot of good sailors in onshore condition and noticed that not everyone move their backhand during the top turn. Which is probably just because they do it a lot earlier.
    Last edited by boards_Tomas; 31st July 2014 at 11:04 AM.
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