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  1. #1
    Senior Member
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    Side-on waveriding

    Hi guys,

    since I surf mostly in Adriatic sea (Italy or Croatia mostly), I am forced to ride side-on or dead on-shore conditions. I figured out I have a bit of a problem getting on top of the wave from bottom turn to cutback, so I was wondering what could be wrong with my technique... I am well powered up and put my rear hand more towards the back of the boom when I commit to bottom turn, but when I come to the point where I should start getting up the wave I loose all the speed and am forced to turn at the lower face of the wave or I end up stopping at the top and consequentially sinking.

    Should I make sharper and more aggressive bottom turns, it seems that it takes a lot of time before I start facing up? Or are there any other tips?

    Thanks.

  2. #2
    Senior Member Billyboy's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by sideskirt View Post
    Should I make sharper and more aggressive bottom turns
    yes. Try and turn tight enough that you stay on the steep part of the wave rather than going out in "the flats" in front of it. You can then use the energy of the wave to keep you planing through to your top turn. Also try and enter the turn with as much speed as possible.

    If it is dead onshore, then it is very hard to ride frontside however good you are so its probably best not to expect too much on those days!

  3. #3
    Speed is the key, think of that first turn like a fast gybe with a fast exit, then at least you will have a bit of apparent wind when you start working down the line. You will probably need to work on your clew-first technique as well. Practise gybing but not flipping the rig or taking your feet out of the straps.

    You bottom turn (gybe) hard, with your back hand well down the boom. As soon as you start heading back up the wave you need to be rotating the rig into the clew first position which also means that your hips need to rotate towards the wave face and (I think) your back knee bends to drop your weight low. As long as you have board speed from the initial turn, the sail will be relatively weightless for the clew first stuff.
    "Surf it, Smell it, Enjoy it..."

  4. #4
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    Thanks guys, so I looks like I was thinking in the right direction just not practicing it and I'll work on that on Sunday apparently.

  5. #5
    Senior Member
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    On Sunday I had a really nice opportunity to give it another go in side-on with 2m waves (I had more sideshore conditions or just chop since last post)...what I find out is that either I get backwinded and thrown on my back, when I reach the top of the wave, or the sail gets torn out of my hands when I go clew first. My thoughts are upper body twist instead of extending my arms to go clew first, but I am not sure when to initiate...Am I thinking in the right direction, what should I correct. Other thing is that, if I try to make a really tight bottom turn I dig my toe side rail and crash into a wave.

    Cheers.
    Sails: HSM Superfreak 4.0, 4.7 & 5.3
    Boards: Flikka boards Allwave 81L 2012, Flikka Freewave 97L 2014

  6. #6
    Senior Member Silicon Beach's Avatar
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    Sep 2005
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    A few things that have helped me:

    Using a twin fin wave board - allows a very tight bottom turn without losing too much speed (short + wide, loose slashy shape).

    "My thoughts are upper body twist instead of extending my arms to go clew first"
    I think both are important. as gmac says above - exaggerate the upper body twist by pointing your hips at the wave. But also open the sail out by straightening / extending the front arm. This position (clew first, switch stance) is quite extreme and needs to be dynamic. There's a good picture of Ben Proffit in this position someone posted on an earlier thread - demonstrates it very well (but look at any video of a pro level sailor in onshore waves - Danny Bruch for instance). Try and get through this part of the turn as quickly as possible so as to minimise the time for the sail to get back-winded or over-powered clew first.

    The more onshore the wind becomes, the more tightly I try and bottom turn ... to the point where in my mind I'm thinking about trying to go through 180 degrees and come straight back at the wave. Of course that's very difficult and maybe my turns are more like 120 or something, but if I have this thought in my mind I make tighter turns.

    "
    if I try to make a really tight bottom turn I dig my toe side rail and crash into a wave ..." This is maybe where my twin fin has really helped me. What board are you on ?

    Big foot straps - so that you can get your foot right over the toe-side rails ... you have them big right ?

    Moving the hands - you are doing the first part - moving the back hand down the boom - but are you / when are you moving the back hand back up the boom to the harness lines ? I find that you need to do this a bit earlier than you think and this will help to open the sail and tighten the turn. Jem Hall says that going for one handed top turns (taking the front hand off the boom and stroking the water) helps with this 'surfing the boom' thing.

    Experimenting with front foot / back foot pressure - sometimes you need to use quite a lot of back foot in the second half of the bottom turn to turn tight. You should experiment to see what works on your board.

    Well powered up (but not too over-powered) - so that you have plenty of speed for the first turn.
    Last edited by Silicon Beach; 25th March 2014 at 11:29 AM.
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  7. #7
    Senior Member
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    Both my boards are 3 fins, one Flikka allwave 81L and one Flikka freewave 97L...In on shore I rather use 97L, if it's not totally overpowered for 4.7 or 4.0 (I'm 82kg) both maintain good speed during the bottom turn so I can get to the top of the wave, so I think basically I need to work on the cutback techinque...I hope I'll get my camera back soon and will be able to provide some footage.
    Sails: HSM Superfreak 4.0, 4.7 & 5.3
    Boards: Flikka boards Allwave 81L 2012, Flikka Freewave 97L 2014

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