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  1. #1
    Senior Member Billyboy's Avatar
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    Default Moves to learn on flat days

    Thinking of things to learn on good days is easy. When you can easily get a few feet of air and there are reasonable waves to wiggle on then you are only limited by your bravery and imagination.
    However, with summer approaching there are going to be plenty of planing days on the south coast where the lack of waves is going to limit your options.


    In the last couple of years I've rarely bothered to sail when there are no waves. I don't have a lot of time for windsurfing, but my time is flexible, so I normally choose the good wave days at the expense of the non-wave days.

    This summer should be different however. I will have a lot more free time, and that time is still flexible. Non-wave days are therefore back on the agenda.

    I'm therefore looking for stuff I can learn when there are no waves. A few years ago (before I discovered Hove and summers were flat) I learnt to forward over the summer and it was an amazing motivator. If there was any chance of a bit of planing breeze I would be frothing to get to the beach.

    I'm after something similar this year. It needs to be suited to learning in the disorganized chop I tend to sail in, and be achievable in about 20 sessions by a mere mortal! Port tack forwards are definitely on the list, but what else? Ideally it would be something that would benefit my wavesailing in some way. Anyone got any good ideas?

    B

  2. #2
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    Go fast and carve hard into a chop you can go for Shove-it or even Shaka!

  3. #3
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    You might be able to do them all ready, but upa and downwind 360s are always loads of fun. Boomerang or cowboy?

  4. #4
    Senior Member Billyboy's Avatar
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    @Harald, I was thinking of a shove-it. I've kindof tried them before but I never have the bottle to get right over the sail and backwind it. It just feels wrong! Any tips?? I think a shaka would be too difficult for me to learn in a short time, but it would be a good way to get into backside 360's on the wave!

    @TJ I used to do carving 360's a lot, but they are better suited to flatt-ish water than they are to our completely random chop. No doubt I'll try a few on the inside at low tide though, along with some duck gybes! I've also done upwind 360s, but normally in sub planing winds. Again they would be good practice for backside 360's. Not that I'll ever pull off a backside 360! Boomerangs look like they could be nailed in a session? I've no idea what a cowboy is!

  5. #5
    Senior Member Billyboy's Avatar
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    this thread was partly inspired by Graham Ezzy's blog. I've always said that if you are not falling in, you aren't trying hard enough. I'm looking forward to a summer of falling in a lot!

  6. #6
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    You sail along and step round the front while sailing along across the wind, then spin the rig round 1 handed to end up back where you started. The spare hand pretends to shoot a cowboys gun for added "coolness". Cant find a better video than this http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5UFScZa1RDY but have seen them done very well out in Dahab. Can be learnt off the plane.

  7. #7
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    You could have a go at sail ducking, which can lead to duck tacks, or more excitingly switch konos (Not that I can do either, but I am trying to get there and very slowly advancing).

    Easiest way I find is to gybe with both feet in the straps, but don't switch them (this'll be easier than going switch planing through chop). Then gain some speed on the new tack and go for the rig duck. Planing switch stance isn't too hard after a few tries.

    I've seen a recent video of Robby Naish doing a switch kono, though entering it from half a downwind 360, so age isn't a barrier!

    I occasionally try shove-its but I find I can never carve hard enough into the wind and lose loads of speed, but I'm probably doing it wrong.

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